Israeli choose’s ruling on Jews who prayed in Al-Aqsa compound ignites controversy

Israeli judge's ruling on Jews who prayed in Al-Aqsa compound ignites controversy


Israeli Magistrate’s Court Judge Zion Sahrai ruled Sunday that three Jewish youths were not violating security conditions when they recited a Jewish prayer at the contested holy area known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as Haram Al-Sharif.

Police had charged all three with security violations for reciting the Shema, banning them from entering Jerusalem’s Old City for 15 days.

Under the so-called Status Quo agreement dating back to Ottoman rule of Jerusalem, only Muslims are allowed to pray inside the Al-Aqsa mosque compound.

Israel and other states agreed to maintain Status Quo access to these holy sites after Israel captured them in the 1967 war.

In his ruling, Judge Sahrai wrote: “In my opinion, it is not possible to say that bowing and reciting prayer — in the circumstances of the case before me — raises a reasonable suspicion of conduct that may lead to a breach of the peace.”

He also explicitly stated that the ruling should not be taken as a decision on the right to…