Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Completes Conceptual Design of VLGC Enabling Conversion … – Press Release


– AIP Acquired from ClassNK in Preparation for Future Viability of Ammonia-Fueled Carriers –

– New design will enable small-scale retrofitting when ammonia fuel goes into practical application
– Ammonia-carrying VLGCs now powered by LPG are highly suited to future use of ammonia fuel

TOKYO, June 10, 2022 – (JCN Newswire) – Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., a part of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) Group, has completed the conceptual design of a Very Large Gas Carrier (VLGC) initially powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) but adaptable to future use of ammonia as the main fuel(1). Approval in Principle (AIP)(2) for the design has been acquired from the Japanese classification society ClassNK.

Image of an LPG-powered VLGC convertible to ammonia fuel

The conceptual design of an LPG-powered VLGC enabling future conversion to ammonia fuel was developed based on Mitsubishi Shipbuilding’s experience and expertise in the construction and delivery of more than 80 very large LPG carriers and multi-purpose gas carriers capable of carrying ammonia. Creation of a design enabling conversion to ammonia fuel in line with future needs is expected to permit relatively small-scale ship retrofitting when use of ammonia fuel becomes a viable option.

Ammonia is expected to come into wide use in the future as a stable and clean source of energy. Because it emits no CO2 when combusted, ammonia is garnering attention as a fuel that will contribute significantly to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the marine industry. Mitsubishi Shipbuilding’s newest VLGCs, in addition to using LPG fuel as an alternative to the conventionally prevalent heavy oil, can also transport ammonia as cargo. As such, the company’s VLGCs are highly suited to using ammonia fuel in the future. In recent years Mitsubishi Shipbuilding has been conducting investigations into the potential use of ammonia fuel in VLGCs as one means of achieving carbon neutrality in the global marine industry by 2050, a target…